Exercise

With the high populations of our time and therefore the prevalence of crowdedness, worrying concerning diseases has become common. There are such a big amount of people running around who might be carriers of debilitating diseases for others. a complex of viruses and bacteria that would ruin some days of your life, or probably kill you.

Not solely do diseases ruin your productivity, however, they conjointly poke a hole in your wallet. you’ll be spending an enormous portion of your money on medicine, simply to medicate yourself. If you are somebody with a weak immune system, drug prices are also a big part of your expenses. it’s even worse once poor immune could be a genetic attribute in your family.

As such, you wish to seek out ways in which to reduce back the chance of sickness as much as you can. an excessive amount of medication, whereas it’s useful, will certainly cause severe side effects that would cause death. you’ll ruin your body over time with the harmful chemicals and antibiotics consumed perpetually. Here are some powerful ways you can boost your immune system.

1. Add Some Sunshine

Researchers are quickly catching on that Vitamin D may be the secret to avoiding the cold and flu. Vitamin D plays an important role in strengthening your defence system to better fight any invading viruses and bacteria. Unfortunately, it is also the number one vitamin deficiency in Americans. Compounding the problem if the fact that Vitamin D is produced when the body gets adequate levels of sunshine, so naturally, even less is produced in the winter months. It has recently been hypothesized that this could be one major reason for the increase in cold and flu cases during the winter season.  Because of this, it’s important that we have alternative ways of getting this powerful immune-boosting vitamin. One great source of Vitamin D is cod liver oil. In addition to the Vitamin D it offers, it’s also a great source of Vitamin A, which is an immune system superstar, and Omega 3 fatty acids, which holds significant health benefits for the heart, brain, skin, and much more.

2. An Apple a Day

When it comes to fighting cold and flu, it is essential to decrease your sugar intake. Sugar has devastating effects on the immune system, and the fact that Americans consume an average of 2-3 pounds of sugar per person every year spells bad news come cold and flu season. Not only does sugar increase the production of hormones that suppress the immune system, refined sugar needs micronutrients to be metabolized. This requires your body to use stored vitamins and minerals, further harming your defences. On the other hand, eating a wide variety of fruits and vegetables will make sure that your body is getting all of the vitamins and minerals that are essential to fighting off the cold and flu. Each and every fruit and vegetable is packed with thousands of phytochemicals. No supplement could ever match the power of eating a whole food. Regardless of what vitamin and mineral you take, it should always be as a supplement to a diet high in fruits and vegetables.

3. Keep Balanced

By now, we all know that stress is bad for us. However, relatively few of us are aware of how stress actually impacts the health of the body. When we experience stress, the natural balance of the body is affected in ways we could never imagine. In fact, stress takes an enormous toll on the immune system. For this reason, it is important to find ways to bring the body back into balance. Meditation, prayer, exercise, and yoga are all great ways of taking care of yourself and keeping stress levels low. Chiropractic adjustments also have a significant effect on the nervous system, creating balance, helping to restore the body’s natural healing potential.

We all want a lean and healthy body, and regular exercise is the only way to have it. But due to the busy lifestyle in this 21st century, we can barely manage enough time to do it. If you have been thinking about exercising regularly for some time, this article is here to motivate you with reasons why you need to hit the gym right now.

1. For an improved memory

Regular exercise not only provides more oxygen to your brain but also boosts your memory power. Recent studies have shown that increased blood flow due to vigorous exercise has a part to play in improving memory power.

2. For more energy

You may feel tired and weak after an intense training session. But with proper rest and nutrition, you will surely have more energy than ever before.

3. For better sleep

Suffering from insomnia? Don’t worry, just start exercising on a regular basis and this problem will be gone in no time. However, remember to exercise in the morning or afternoon instead of right before going to the bed.

4. For a stress-free life

Stress may be a part of your life, but you have the chance to fight it off with regular exercise. Endorphins released in the brain while exercising efficiently reduce stress, making you feel better at all times.

5. For superior immunity

Just exercise 3 to 4 times a week and soon your immune system will be strong enough to fight off flu, viruses and other diseases. Some researchers proved that those who exercise regularly are half as likely to get a cold than those who don’t do it at all.

6. For better sex

We all know regular exercise helps improve blood circulation all over the body. Thus, it helps increase sexual stimulation and reduces erectile dysfunction.

7. For superior confidence

Hitting the gym on a daily basis helps you look good and stay fit. When you feel better about yourself, you feel confident in doing whatever you do.

8. For living longer

It’s a known fact that staying fit and healthy is the key to living a long life and avoiding premature ageing. One study found that you will get the same benefits of quitting smoking if you take part in regular training sessions. Moreover, you can expect to add 10 to 20 more years in your life expectancy if you live on a proper diet and stay fit at all times.

Let’s admit that it’s hard for us to manage even one hour every day to go to the gym. No matter what, you must try your best in order to live a happy and fulfilling life.

In order to create change, you have to make the decision that you want to change. Here are some of the tips that work for me and my clients; they can help you start living a healthier life right away.

1. Replace one “bad” with one “good.”

Every day, pick out one “bad” food and replace it with a “good” food. Instead of french fries at lunch, have a side salad or veggie. Instead of a cupcake and sugary coffee at 3PM, have a small fruit salad and a cup of tea. After you do this for a few days, start replacing two “bad” with two “good.” You’ll be eating healthier in no time!

2. Get strong.

When you strength train, your body continues to burn calories for the next 24-36 hours (as opposed to just cardio, where you only burn for that duration). Strength training is vital to keep muscles strong, stoke your metabolism and create a leaner body. Add at least two days a week of weight training or body resistance exercises to your routine. If you’re unsure how to begin, consider investing in a personal trainer for a few sessions to show you the ropes.

If that bag of Doritos isn’t there, you can’t eat that bag of Doritos. Clean out your fridge, clean out your cupboards and set yourself up for success. Stock up on healthier options when you shop for food.

4. Downsize.

Avoid getting to that ravenous “feed me” state where you can’t stop eating. Try eating six smaller, well-balanced mini-meals instead of three larger ones. Use a smaller plate, chew slowly and put your fork down between bites.

5. Go for exercise bursts.

You can achieve amazing results (without spending hours at the gym) with shorter, higher intensity “bursts”. Even 4-6 minutes burns calories, tones muscle and helps condition you like an athlete. Try for 2-4 bursts throughout the day at least 5 days a week.

6. Put the brakes on after dinner.

Try to identify why you’re reaching for those mindless munchies in the evening. Learning what the triggers are can help you stop. Are you bored? Is it just a habit? Did you not eat a healthy, balanced dinner? Try a cup of peppermint tea first and make sure you’re set up with healthier snack options.

7. Take your breathing seriously.

Our breath is our life. Health benefits when we do proper breathing include better digestion, better nervous system function and deeper relaxation. Be aware and tune into your breath throughout the day.

Sex has some awesome health benefits. It relieves stress, boosts immunity, strengthens your heart and can burn up to 140 calories per half hour. (That’s if you get really busy!) Keep the sex spark alive for your relationship as well as your health.

9. Manage stress in real time.

The effect of repetitive stress wreaks havoc as toxic hormones flood our body. Long ago, we needed this “flight or fight” mode to survive. Today this response is more likely due to everyday stresses like conflicts with a partner or rushing to complete a deadline.

When a stressful situation presents itself, remove yourself as quickly as possible. Use breathing to calm yourself, count to ten, go for a walk, do what you need to do to stay calm. Taking a few moments during the day to meditate helps “train” you to implement calming techniques you can draw upon when needed.

10. Create a bedtime ritual.

Just like our parents did for us and we do for our children, creating a simple bedtime routine ensures an easier time falling asleep, staying asleep and better quality sleep. Aim to retire at the same time every night. Turn off all screens and dim lights 1-2 hours before bedtime. Have a relaxing bath, listen to gentle music, massage lotion or oil onto your body and make yourself a cup of chamomile tea. You’ll help reduce stress (fighting that nasty belly fat), depression, decrease inflammation and you’ll look and feel better.

Set yourself up for success and view positive change as a gift to yourself, a way to acknowledge and honor your body, mind and spirit. Try some of these suggestions and kickstart your healthier life today.

There is much debate as to whether or not Type 2 diabetes is a preventable disease. Some believe there is little that can be done to stop its development, as it is mostly defined by genetics. Some people are more predisposed to this form of diabetes, so the influence of genes is real. Certain ethnicities come to mind, not to mention family history is also a proven factor.

Believing there is not a preventable component to developing Type 2 diabetes would be a misunderstanding. In fact, three factors can make a difference. Let us go over the reasons why the following are the three keys…

1. Maintaining a healthy weight. The benefit of maintaining a healthy body weight is often underestimated. It is not all about physique and waist size. Body weight is a reflection of one’s internal health. When body weight becomes excessive, it is a sign the individual is carrying too much body fat. Not only does this jeopardize cardiovascular health, but it also impairs insulin function, facilitating the development of Type 2 Diabetes.

The first step to preventing Type 2 diabetes is maintaining an appropriate body weight.

2. Regular exercise. Exercise does not just help you burn calories. It has a direct effect on insulin function and blood sugar control. Anyone who works out will enjoy this benefit. What is more, almost any type of physical activity will work, as long as there is exertion and a mild sweat: this is why home workouts are never a bad idea.

The second step to preventing Type 2 diabetes is exercising regularly. Four times a week is ideal, but even three times will work.

3. Healthy eating. Lastly and perhaps most importantly comes healthy eating. We have all taken the effect of our food choices for granted. At some point, there is a price to pay, and it may be that moment that reminds you to start eating properly. Being diagnosed with prediabetes is often a warning of what is likely to come if changes to your lifestyle are not made.

Healthy eating is essential, whether you are looking to prevent diabetes or not. With that said, it can be considered more relevant for diabetics deliberating acting to avoid raising their blood sugar levels and body weight. For this reason, healthy eating is the third and most vital step to preventing, even controlling Type 2 diabetes.

Now you are familiar with the three keys to preventing Type 2 diabetes; you have the tools to make improvements. Even if your blood sugar is a minor concern, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising, and eating well can only make a positive difference in your life.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

Your diet is inflammatory

When you’re eating a diet full of processed foods, or even foods you have sensitivities to, you are making things harder for your body. Inflammatory foods create more free radicals in the body, which do damage and make it more difficult for the cells to produce energy. Ditch the sugary, processed foods and start eating more greens and berries.

Your diet is imbalanced.

If you aren’t getting enough nutrients—protein, iron, vitamins, greens—you might begin to feel a little sluggish. Anemia is the perfect example of fatigue induced by a deficit of iron in the body. You need a variety of foods in your diet. Subsisting, for instance, on protein bars is not balanced nutrition. Try smoothies or juices to fit a large amount of whole food nutrients into a small, tasty package.

 You have depression or anxiety.

Anxiety and depression can cause hormonal havoc for all those feel-good hormones like dopamine and endorphins. Many people are well aware that depression can manifest as a lack of motivation or energy to do things. Meanwhile, suffering from a lot of stress or anxiety can lead to poor quality sleep, which means you’re getting enough sleep-in terms of hours, but it’s not restful sleep. It is important to consult a professional if these are your concern.

You’re constantly stressed on some level.

This is a big one. If you are always on the go and never take time for quiet mindfulness, you are probably going to wipe yourself out to the point where not even a good night of sleep feels like enough to reduce your exhaustion. And coffee can only serve as an exhaustion band-aid for so long. Eventually, even the strongest cold brew won’t be enough to perk you up. It’s called adrenal fatigue. It is caused by chronic stress, over exercising, poor diet, too little sleep—essentially just general neglect of the body’s balance. It is believed to afflict a massive percentage of our population. Your adrenal glands are responsible for releasing around 50 different hormones, so problems with your adrenals can cause imbalance throughout the body. If you are concerned, contact a trusted professional to help you adjust your diet, lifestyle and stress levels so that you can allow your body to recuperate.

Your gut critters are displeased.

Believe it or not, an imbalance in your microbiome can cause you to be inexplicably tired. And why not? They exert control over our weight, our moods and our fitness. For instance, an overgrowth of yeast in the gut (from a sugary diet) can oftentimes result in brain fog and general fatigue.

You’re not moving enough.

If you live a sedentary lifestyle—you work at a desk, you watch a lot of television, you rarely exercise—you may begin to feel more tired. Energy creates energy, so if you aren’t feeding your body any energy through movement then your body will pay you back with tiredness and sluggishness. Do yourself a favour and take a brisk walk outside every morning.

Of course, there is always the possibility you may have some other underlying condition, so it’s best to check in with your doctor if you have any concerns. Being exhausted, or even just a little fatigued, day after day is not normal. It is a sign that something is off in your body. Take extra care, eat well, meditate, ditch caffeine. Give your body what it needs to become balanced and energised again.

How you react to being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes does not have to dictate how you feel about the disease. Type 2 diabetes, while a lethal disease, is not a death sentence. Your life is not at immediate risk just because you are a diabetic. Even though it is a serious cause for concern and you most definitely should work on a solution, there is no need to damn yourself or lose spirit.

It is certainly possible to live well despite having to control the type of carbohydrates and fats you need to eat each and every day. But there is hope even in doing a few but essential things to change your health.

It is all about blood sugar. Hyperglycemia is the condition underlying this form of diabetes and most of its problems…

  • cardiovascular conditions,
  • nerve and kidney damage,
  • skin problems, and
  • impaired vision

are all caused by chronically elevated blood sugar. For this reason, the first step to living well is to control your food intake so the high readings no longer cause internal damage. Talk to your doctor to determine the target range you should strive for. He can give you practical advice tailored for you so you can make daily progress.Keeping blood sugar readings within a reasonable range is your most important task: this is needed to ensure the disease does not exacerbate and add insult to injury.

Let’s talk about nutrition. Eating healthily is the key to living well with Type 2 diabetes. By eating healthy foods, you will gradually reduce your blood sugar. What and how you eat makes a difference. Your doctor can fill you in on more details. Do not overlook the importance of having a quality diet. Keep your blood sugar levels in line with delicious recipes and daily meal plans.

Next, comes exercise. Increase your daily activity and develop several blood sugar busting exercise routines. Exercise is essential for everyone, never mind people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Without physical activity, our health is left vulnerable to unpredictable circumstances. Don’t invite illnesses upon yourself by being sedentary.

Type 2 diabetics can improve their condition with regular exercise. Learn to enjoy physical activity sooner rather than later, because it is one of the most important habits you can develop in your life.

Also, living well requires you maintain a healthy body weight. Work on dropping a few pounds if you are above the ideal range. Exercising and eating well are the two main ingredients for weight loss, so dedicate your efforts in these areas so your weight is no longer a problem.

Uncontrolled blood sugar levels will shave years off your life. Lower your blood sugar, lose weight, and stop Type 2 diabetes and its complications in their tracks. Provided you are consistent; it will just be a matter of time.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

Your choice of partner can affect your health in many ways, both positively and negatively. Anything from their exercise habits and working hours to their personality can have an impact on your well-being. We investigate the surprising ways that your significant other can affect your health.

Whether you are in a new relationship or a long-term one, newlyweds or celebrating your golden wedding anniversary, a same-sex couple or of the opposite sex, the time spent with your partner can influence your health outcomes.

Having a healthy relationship is not only rewarding, but it also significantly shapes our long-term health in a similar way to getting a good night’s sleep, eating healthfully, and not smoking. Studies have shown, time and time again, that people who are in satisfying relationships feel happier, have fewer problems with health, and live longer.

On the flip side, having unhealthy connections or a lack of social ties is linked to depression, cognitive decline, and an increased risk of premature death.

Here are some of the beneficial and detrimental effects that your relationship could have on your well-being.

Positive effects of a partner on health

Pain relief

woman in labor holding partner's hand
A partner’s touch has been found to relieve pain in women.

It is well known that people subconsciously synchronize their footsteps when they walk together or mirror a friend’s posture during a conversation.

Investigators from the University of Colorado, Boulder and the University of Haifa in Israel have now discovered that when heterosexual lovers touch when the woman is in pain, couples’ heart rates and respiratory patterns synchronize and the woman’s pain dissipates.

These findings add to a growing body of evidence on “interpersonal synchronization,” a phenomenon in which people begin to physiologically mirror those that they spend time with. “The more empathic the partner and the stronger the analgesic effect, the higher the synchronization between the two when they are touching,” explains lead author Pavel Goldstein, a postdoctoral pain researcher at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Help achieve healthy goals

Two heads are better than one when it comes to taking up healthy habits. Funded by Cancer Research UK, the British Heart Foundation, and the National Institute on Aging, scientists at University College London (UCL) in the United Kingdom revealed that if you want to swap bad habits for good, then you would be more successful if your partner also makes those changes.

Among women who smoked, the researchers found that 50 percent succeeded in quitting smokingif their partner gave up at the same time, compared with 17 percent whose partners were non-smokers already, and just 8 percent whose partners smoked regularly.

“Unhealthy lifestyles are a leading cause of death from chronic disease worldwide,” says study author Prof. Jane Wardle, director of Cancer Research UK’s Health Behaviour Research Centre at UCL. “The key lifestyle risks are smoking, excess weight, physical inactivity, poor diet, and alcohol consumption. Swapping bad habits for good ones can reduce the risk of disease, including cancer.”

Improve fitness

Echoing these findings, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, MD, conducted research finding that improving your fitness could also improve the fitness of your spouse.

Couples were asked about their physical activity levels at two medical visits conducted around 6 years apart. On the first visit, if a wife met the recommended guidelines for physical activity, her husband was 70 percent more likely to also reach those targets at subsequent visits than those whose wives were less active.

Conversely, when a husband met recommended activity levels, his wife was 40 percent more likely to also achieve these levels at follow-up visits.

When it comes to physical fitness, the best peer pressure to get moving could be coming from the person who sits across from you at the breakfast table,” says co-author Laura Cobb, a doctoral student at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “There’s an epidemic of people in this country who don’t get enough exercise, and we should harness the power of the couple to ensure people are getting a healthy amount of physical activity.”

Alter microbiome

man standing in the shower
Microbial exchange with your partner can occur simply from walking on the same bathroom floor.

Researchers from the University of Waterloo in Canada found that couples who live together influence the microbiome – that is, the community of bacteria and other microbes – on each other’s skin.

Commonalities between couples’ skin microbiome were strong enough that computer algorithms could detect couples that cohabit with an accuracy of 86 percent.

Skin regions that were the most similar between partners were on the couples’ feet. “In hindsight, it makes sense,” says Prof. Josh Neufeld, of the Faculty of Science in the Department of Biology at the University of Waterloo. “You shower and walk on the same floor barefoot. This process likely serves as a form of microbial exchange with your partner, and also with your home itself.”

Improve physical and mental health

While analyzing whether or not relationships are good for your health, David and John Gallacher, from Cardiff University in the U.K., confirmed that long-term, committed relationships are good for physical and psychological health, and that these benefits increase over time.

On average, individuals who are married live longer; women have better mental health when they are in committed relationships, while men have better physical health when in a committed relationship. The study authors say, “On balance it probably is worth making the effort.”

Decrease risk of health conditions

Studies have shown that partners can also affect each other’s risk and development of disease.

woman and man arguing
Persistent nagging from your partner could slow down diabetes progression.

For example, a study by Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing deduced that for men who are in an unhappy marriage, the development of diabetes is slower and treatment is more successful once they are diagnosed.

The researchers said that wives who continuously regulate their husband’s health behaviors and who are seen as annoying and provoking hostility and emotional distress in the husbands could explain this finding.

The study challenges the traditional assumption that negative marital quality is always detrimental to health,” says lead investigator Hui Liu, an associate professor of sociology at MSU. “It also encourages family scholars to distinguish different sources and types of marital quality. Sometimes, nagging is caring.”

Researchers from the University of Michigan have also determined that having an optimistic spouse predicted fewer chronic illnesses and better mobility over time.

A growing body of research shows that the people in our social networks can have a profound influence on our health and well-being,” says lead study author Eric Kim, a doctoral student in the University of Michigan’s Department of Psychology. “This is the first study to show that someone else’s optimism could be impacting your own health.”

In other research, people who are happily wed are more than three times as likely to be alive 15 years after coronary bypass surgery as their unmarried counterparts. Married people also are less likely to have cardiovascular problems than individuals who are single, divorced, or widowed.

Adverse effects of a partner on health

Intensify pain

In contrast to the research that showed a partner’s touch decreases pain, a study by King’s College London in the U.K. found that being in the company of your partner could make pain worse.

The researchers found that the more avoidant of closeness women were in their relationships, the more pain they experienced when given a laser pulse on their finger.

Research led by the University of Edinburgh in the U.K. also found a connection between partners and pain. The team found that partners of individuals with depression have an increased risk of experiencing chronic pain.

The researchers’ analysis showed that depression and chronic pain share common causes. Some of these causes are genetic while others stem from the environment shared by the partners.

Derail your diet

healthy eating plan
Dieting with your partner could end up derailing your weight loss plans.

Dieting with your partner may seem to be a good idea, but research has indicated that among romantic couples, the more successful one partner is at restricting their diet and eating more healthfully, the less confident the other partner becomes at controlling their food portions.

When people strive to reach a goal, being close (in this case, romantically) with someone who is successfully reaching the same goal can make the other partner less confident in their own efforts to reach the goal,” explains Jennifer Jill Harman, an associate professor at Colorado State University in Fort Collins.

Facilitate weight gain

Marriage has been positively correlated with weight gain among couples. For example, lead researcher Andrea L. Meltzer – an assistant professor at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, TX – and collaborators unveiled that newlyweds who are satisfied with their marriage are more likely to gain weight in the early years of marriage than those who are unsatisfied.

“On average, spouses who were more satisfied with their marriage were less likely to consider leaving their marriage, and they gained more weight over time,” states Prof. Meltzer. “In contrast, couples who were less satisfied in their relationship tended to gain less weight over time.

Other research by the University of Bath’s School of Management in the U.K. showed that marriage makes men gain weight and that fatherhood exacerbates the problem further.

Increase risk of health conditions

In contrast with research signalling that your significant other can decrease your risk of certain health conditions, other studies show the reverse.

For example, the McGill University Health Centre in Canada has suggested that if someone has type 2 diabetes, their partner has a 26 percent increased risk of also developing the condition.

While spouses are not related biologically, they share the same environment, social habits, and eating and exercising patterns – all of which are factors that alter the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

“When we talk about family history of type 2 diabetes, we generally assume that the risk increase that clusters in families results from genetic factors. What our analyses demonstrate is that risk is shared by spouses,” says senior study author Kaberi Dasgupta, of the Research Institute at McGill University.

a couple sitting on the bed ignoring each other
Giving your spouse the silent treatment increases your risk of back pain and stiff muscles.

Furthermore, the way that you react to disagreements and argue with your partner could predict health problems later in life. The University of California, Berkeley, and Northwestern University in Evanston, IL, revealed that fits of rage during marital spats can predict cardiovascular problems, and shutting down and giving the silent treatment raises the risk of a bad back or stiff muscles.

“Conflict happens in every marriage, but people deal with it in different ways. Some of us explode with anger; some of us shut down,” says lead study author Claudia Haase, an assistant professor of human development and social policy at Northwestern University. “Our study shows that these different emotional behaviours can predict the development of different health problems in the long run.”

Research has also indicated that individuals may unintentionally worsen their partner’s insomnia. Moreover, other research found that inflammation markers rise in tired partners who argue.

Additionally, in older adults, researchers learned that the frailer an individual – a condition that affects around 10 percent of those aged 65 and over – the more likely it is that they will become depressed. Equally, the more depressed an older person is, the frailer they will become.

What is more, people married to frail spouses had an increased risk of becoming frail themselves, and those married to a depressed partner were also more likely to become depressed.

And interestingly, health changes influenced by a romantic partner do not necessarily end when they pass away.

Kyle Bourassa, a psychology doctoral student at the University of Arizona in Tucson, and colleagues found that couples’ qualities of life are linked even when one partner dies.

The people we care about continue to influence our quality of life even when they are gone. We found that a person’s quality of life is as interwoven with and dependent on their deceased spouse’s earlier quality of life as it is with a person they may see every day.

Kyle Bourassa

Bourassa says that even though we have lost the people we love, they remain with us. The research highlights how important relationships are for our health and well-being. However, he does say that the findings are cut both ways. “If a participant’s quality of life was low prior to his or her death, then this could take a negative toll on the partner’s later quality of life as well.”