Back acne

Regular vaginal discharge is a sign of a healthy female reproductive system. Normal vaginal discharge contains a mixture of cervical mucus, vaginal fluid, dead cells, and bacteria.

Females may experience heavy vaginal discharge from arousal or during ovulation. However, excessive vaginal discharge that smells bad or looks unusual can indicate an underlying condition.

This articles discusses why someone may have heavy vaginal discharge and what they can do about it.

1. Arousal

Sexual arousal triggers several physical responses in the body. Arousal increases blood flow in the genitals. As a result, the blood vessels enlarge, which pushes fluid to the surface of the vaginal walls.

Arousal fluid is clear and watery with a slippery texture. This fluid helps lubricate the vagina during sex.

Other signs of female arousal include:

  • increased heart rate and breathing
  • flushing of the face, neck, and chest
  • swelling of the breasts
  • erect nipples

2. Ovulation

Cervical fluid is a gel-like liquid that contains proteins, carbohydrates, and amino acids. The texture and amount of cervical fluid both change throughout a female’s menstrual cycle.

For example, after menstruation, cervical fluid has a thick, mucus-like texture. It can be cloudy, white, or yellow.

Estrogen levels increase closer to ovulation. This causes the cervical fluid to become clear and slippery, similar to that of raw egg whites.

Cervical fluid discharge increases during the days leading up to ovulation and decreases after ovulation. Females may have no discharge for a few days after their period.

3. Hormonal imbalances

Hormonal imbalances related to stress, diet, or underlying medical conditions can cause heavier vaginal discharge.

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), for example, refers to a set of symptoms that occur as a result of hormonal imbalances. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), PCOS affects up to 5 million females in the United States.

Those with PCOS have higher levels of male hormones called androgens. Increased androgen levels can:

  • change the amount or texture of cervical fluid
  • cause irregular periods
  • prevent ovulation

Not everyone with PCOS will have increased vaginal discharge. Paying attention to other PCOS symptoms may help someone identify and seek treatment for the condition faster.

Some other symptoms of PCOS to look out for include:

  • fewer than eight periods in 1 year, or periods that occur every roughly 21 days
  • excess facial and body hair
  • thinning hair or hair loss
  • acne on the face and body
  • weight gain
  • darkening of the skin on the neck, groin, or breasts
  • skin tags on the armpits or neck

Hormonal birth control, such as birth control pills and intrauterine devices, can also cause increased vaginal discharge, especially during the first few months of use.

Excess vaginal discharge and other symptoms, such as spotting and cramping, usually resolve once the body adjusts to the hormonal birth control.

4. Vaginitis

Vaginitis refers to inflammation of the vagina, which can occur from an infection or irritation due to factors such as douches, lubricants, and ill-fitting clothing.

Vaginitis can cause thick vaginal discharge that may be white, gray, yellow, or green.

Other symptoms of vaginitis include:

  • foul vaginal odor
  • an itching or burning sensation in the genital area
  • redness or inflammation of the vagina
  • pain or discomfort when urinating
  • pain during sexual intercourse

5. Bacterial vaginosis

Bacterial vaginosis is a condition that results from an overgrowth of bacteria in the vagina. This vaginal infection is the most common among females aged 15–44 years.

The exact cause of bacterial vaginosis remains unclear. Females can develop bacterial vaginosis after sexual intercourse. However, this condition is not a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

According to the Office on Women’s Health, those who have bacterial vaginosis may notice a milky or gray-colored vaginal discharge. Some also report a strong, fishy vaginal odor, especially after sexual intercourse.

Bacterial vaginosis can also cause:

  • discomfort when urinating
  • painful burning or itching in the vagina
  • irritation of the skin around the vagina

6. Yeast infection

Vaginal yeast infections result from an overgrowth of the Candida fungus. Females of all ages can develop a vaginal yeast infection, and nearly 70% will have a yeast infection at some point in their lives.

The most common symptom of a vaginal yeast infection is an intense itching in the vagina and vulva.

Vaginal yeast infections can also cause an odorless vaginal discharge that looks similar to cottage cheese.

Vaginal yeast infections are treatable at home using over-the-counter antifungal ointments. Symptoms should improve within a few days. However, severe infections can last longer and may require medical treatment.

7. Trichomoniasis

Trichomoniasis is an STI caused by a parasite. Females can develop trichomoniasis after having sex with someone who has the parasite.

Although most people who have trichomoniasis do not experience symptoms, some may have an itching or burning sensation in the genital area.

Trichomoniasis infections can also cause excess vaginal discharge that has a foul or fishy odor and a white, yellow, or green color. It may also be thinner than usual.

What is healthy discharge?

Healthy vaginal discharge varies from person to person. It also changes throughout their menstrual cycle.

In general, healthy vaginal discharge can appear thin and watery or thick and cloudy. Clear, white, or off-white vaginal discharge is also perfectly normal.

Some females may have brown, red, or black vaginal discharge at the end of their menstrual periods if their vaginal discharge still contains blood from the uterus.

Natural hormonal changes during ovulation can cause an increase in vaginal discharge, which should return to normal after ovulation.

When to see a doctor

It is not always necessary to see a doctor about excessive vaginal discharge. However, a female may want to consider seeing their doctor if their vaginal discharge has an abnormal appearance.

Yellow, green, gray, or foul-smelling vaginal discharge could indicate an infection. Other reasons to see a doctor include:

  • itching or burning near the genitals
  • discomfort or pain when urinating
  • discomfort or pain during sexual intercourse

Possible treatment options

Treating excess vaginal discharge depends on the underlying cause.

People can reduce symptoms of vaginitis by avoiding the source of irritation. Doctors can treat bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections using antibiotics or antifungals.

Doctors can also treat trichomoniasis using antibiotics. The CDC recommend that females wait 7–10 days after receiving treatment before having sex.

Treatment for PCOS varies depending on the individual. A doctor may recommend a combination of lifestyle changes and medications to help people manage their symptoms and regulate their hormone levels.

Maintaining a healthy body weight and eating a varied diet low in added sugars may also help improve some symptoms of PCOS. Birth control pills that contain estrogen or progestin can help balance out excess levels of androgens.

Tips for managing heavy vaginal discharge

Even healthy vaginal discharge can cause discomfort at times. Here are some tips for managing heavy vaginal discharge:

  • Wear panty liners. However, be sure not to let them become too moist, as this can increase the risk of urinary tract infections and vaginitis.
  • Choose breathable underwear made from natural fibers such as cotton.
  • Avoid wearing tight pants.
  • Avoid using hygiene products that contain added fragrances, coloring agents, or other harsh chemicals.
  • Keep the genital area clean and dry.
  • Wipe from the front to the back when using the bathroom.

Outlook

Excess vaginal discharge can occur as a result of arousal, ovulation, or infections. Normal vaginal discharge ranges in color from clear or milky to white.

The consistency of vaginal discharge also varies from thin and watery to thick and sticky. Generally, healthy vaginal discharge should be relatively odorless.

A female can speak with a healthcare professional if they notice any symptoms of an infection. Some symptoms to look out for include:

  • yellow, green, or gray vaginal discharge
  • foul-smelling vaginal discharge
  • discharge that looks similar to cottage cheese
  • itching or burning in or near the genitals

Doctors can easily treat most vaginal infections using antimicrobial medications. Depending on the severity of the infection, people may see their symptoms improving within a few days to weeks.

Lower abdominal pain is pain that occurs below a person’s belly button. Bloating refers to a feeling of pressure or fullness in the abdomen, or a visibly distended abdomen. Sometimes, these symptoms occur together.

Though occasional lower abdominal pain and bloating are common, a person should speak to their doctor if it becomes a regular occurrence. In some cases, this combination of symptoms may indicate an underlying issue that requires medical treatment.

Keep reading for more information on some of the more common causes of abdominal pain and bloating. We also outline various treatment options for this combination of symptoms.

Causes of both abdominal pain and bloating

There are several causes of combined lower abdominal pain (LAP) and bloating. Some relatively harmless, or benign, causes include:

  • consumption of high fat foods
  • swallowing too much air
  • stress

In some cases, LAP and bloating can occur as a result of an underlying medical condition, such as:

  • constipation
  • food intolerances, such as lactose or gluten intolerance
  • gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), although this more commonly causes upper abdominal pain-gastroenteritis, which is inflammation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that causes vomiting and diarrhoea
  • diverticulitis, which is inflammation or infection of part of the large intestine
  • ileus, which is a condition that slows the function of the small and large intestine
  • delayed stomach emptying, or gastroparesis, which is a complication of diabetes mellitus
  • intestinal obstruction
  • inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis)

Other conditions that can cause LAP and bloating are specific to females. These include:

  • menstrual pain
  • endometriosis
  • ovarian cysts
  • pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
  • pregnancy
  • ectopic pregnancy

LAP and bloating can also be due to conditions that do not necessarily affect the stomach, intestines, or reproductive organs. These conditions include;

  • drug allergies
  • side effects of certain medications
  • hernia
  • cystitis, or infection of the urinary tract infection
  • appendicitis, or inflammation of the appendix
  • kidney stones

When to see a doctor

If the cause of LAP and bloating is relatively benign, symptoms should go away within a few hours to days.

A person should see a doctor if:

  • their symptoms last longer than a few days
  • their symptoms begin to interfere with their daily life
  • they are pregnant and are unsure of the cause of LAP and bloating

People should seek immediate medical attention if vomiting or the inability to pass gas occur alongside LAP and bloating.

People who experience LAP and bloating along with one or more of the following symptoms should seek emergency medical attention:

  • sudden worsening of pain
  • fever
  • unusual vaginal discharge
  • bloody stool
  • unexplained weight loss
  • severe nausea and vomiting

Diagnosis

To make a diagnosis, a doctor will begin by carrying out a physical examination. An initial examination will involve applying pressure to the abdomen. This will help the doctor to check the location of pain and to feel for any abnormalities.

A doctor will also make a note of the person’s medical history, and any other symptoms they experience. They may also ask whether there is anything that triggers the pain or makes it worse.

Diagnostic tests, such as urine, blood, or stool tests, may also be necessary. These can help to identify signs of infection or other underlying conditions.

In some cases, a doctor may order one of the following imaging tests to check for abnormalities in the abdomen:

  • ultrasound
  • X-ray
  • CT or MRI

If the imaging tests come back normal, a doctor may perform a colonoscopy for a closer look inside the intestines.

Treatment

The following are some general home treatment options that may help to alleviate symptoms of LAP and bloating:

  • increasing fluid intake
  • exercising to help alleviate gas and bloating
  • taking over-the-counter (OTC) pain medications
  • taking OTC antacids

If home treatments do not work, a person should speak to their doctor about other treatment options. These will vary, depending on the cause of LAP and bloating. However, some examples include:

  • prescription medications to treat pain and bloating
  • antibiotics to help treat a bacterial infection
  • emergency surgery to remove a ruptured appendix

Prevention

There are some steps a person can take to help alleviate LAP and bloating. Two key steps include quitting smoking and avoiding trigger foods.

The following are examples of foods that may cause or contribute to LAP and bloating:

  • high fat foods
  • certain plant-based foods, such as cabbage, lentils, and beans
  • dairy products if a person is lactose intolerant
  • carbonated drinks
  • beer
  • chewing gum
  • hard candy

Also, people may benefit from increasing their intake of high fiber foods such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. This will help to prevent constipation and associated bloating.

If an underlying condition is the cause of LAP and bloating, then treating the condition should help to alleviate these symptoms.

Outlook

There are many potential causes of lower abdominal pain and bloating. Some causes are relatively benign and easy to treat, while others may be more serious.

Occasional lower abdominal pain and bloating are usually not a cause for concern. However, people should see a doctor if their symptoms worsen, last more than a few days, or disrupt their daily activities.

People who experience additional symptoms, such as vomiting, fever, or blood in the stool, should seek emergency medical attention.

In some cases, people can prevent lower abdominal pain and bloating by avoiding foods that may trigger these symptoms.

There are many misconceptions about masturbation. A lack of research into its long-term effects may contribute to some of these misapprehensions. Both masturbation and acne relate to hormonal changes, but is there a link between the two?

It is a common myth that masturbation causes acne. While both are common during puberty, this is the only real link between them.

Keep reading to learn more about the relationship between masturbation and acne, the causes of acne, and how to treat it.

Does masturbation cause acne?

Hormonal changes occur during puberty. These hormonal changes cause the body to produce more oil, which may contribute to the development of acne. Many people also start masturbating during puberty, which also has a small effect on hormone levels.

Because acne and masturbation tend to occur around the same time, this could explain the common misconception that masturbation causes acne. However, it is a myth — both masturbation and acne relate to hormonal changes.

Masturbation and hormones

Although masturbation can cause changes in hormone levels, these changes are minimal.

Testosterone levels rise during masturbation and return to normal after ejaculation. The effect is temporary and does not appear to have any long-term health implications.

One study looked at hormonal changes after masturbation following a period of abstinence. The findings indicate that any hormonal changes following masturbation are temporary and minimal. This, however, only looks at the short term effects.

There has been little research into the long-term effects of masturbation on hormone levels.

Causes of acne

Acne is a skin condition that causes whiteheads, blackheads, and pimples to develop.

Pores under the skin connect to glands that produce sebum, which is n oily substance. These glands can become blocked by a buildup of sebum, dead skin, or other debris. Bacteria can accumulate and cause inflammation. This leads to the visible symptoms of acne, such as pimples.

Acne can develop anywhere on the body. It is most common on:

  • the face
  • shoulders
  • back
  • chest
  • arms

While acne can develop at any age, it usually occurs and is most prominent during puberty.

The exact causes of acne are unclear but may relate to:

  • hormonal changes
  • medicines
  • cosmetic use
  • genetics

Poor hygiene does not cause acne, but it can make the symptoms worse in people who already have it.

Acne treatment

There are many different treatments for acne. Choosing the right one will depend on the severity of the condition.

There is a variety of over-the-counter (OTC) medications that are suitable for most types of acne. They are available as gels, creams, soaps, or lotions.

In mild cases, suitable OTC products should contain active ingredients such as:

  • benzoyl peroxide
  • salicylic acid

Some products will contain more than one of these substances.

Doctors recommend that people try combinations of these products when one does not work. Acne can have different causes that require different treatments. Start with one type of treatment and add a second if there is no improvement within 4 to 6 weeks.

In moderate cases, a doctor may prescribe antibiotics to treat the acne if it is due to a bacterial infection. The antibiotics, which can be a cream or a pill, will help fight the bacteria that are causing the inflammation. This may be in addition to OTC medications, such as benzoyl peroxide. Antibiotics may include the following:

  • clindamycin
  • erythromycin

In severe cases, such as cystic acne (nodular acne), a doctor may suggest isotretinoin. This drug comes as a capsule and is highly effective for treating acne. However, isotretinoin can have serious side effects, including:

  • dry skin
  • dry eyes
  • sore throat
  • skin rashes
  • headaches
  • anxiety
  • severe stomach pain
  • bloody diarrhea
  • yellowing skin
  • difficulty urinating

Doctors will only use isotretinoin in the most severe cases because of all these side effects. Anyone taking this medication should keep an eye out for any of these side effects and report them to a doctor if they experience any of them.

While it is difficult to prevent acne from developing, some tips for people who are prone to acne include:

  • avoiding washing more than twice a day
  • washing sweat off the face
  • avoiding scrubbing areas of skin prone to acne
  • using cosmetic products that do not clog pores
  • trying not to touch or pick at the acne
  • keeping bedding and clothing clean
  • spreading acne medication on all acne-prone areas, not just where outbreaks occur

When to see a doctor

Acne is a widespread condition and rarely has any serious health implications.

Most cases of acne do not require a doctor. OTC medications should clear away symptoms without the need for stronger medicine.

If the acne does not improve after 4 to 6 weeks of home treatment, consider seeing a doctor.

Summary

Masturbation does not cause acne.

Hormonal changes may contribute to the development of acne, and masturbation can also cause changes in hormone levels, but these disappear after ejaculation. Furthermore, these hormonal changes are minimal and do not contribute to the development of acne.

People tend to start masturbating and develop acne at around the same time, typically during puberty. This is likely a source of the confusion and the myth that masturbating causes acne.

The exact cause of acne remains unclear.

Acne is a widespread condition with many different treatments. Most cases of acne are mild and do not require a doctor. In more severe cases, a doctor may prescribe antibiotics or stronger forms of medication.

Neem oil is an extract of the neem tree. Some practitioners of traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine use neem oil to treat conditions ranging from ulcers to fungal infections.

This type of oil contains several compounds, including fatty acids and antioxidants, that can benefit the skin.

Below, find out about the uses and potential benefits of neem oil, as well as the risks. We also provide tips for using neem oil on the skin.

What is neem oil?

Neem oil derives from the fruits and seeds of the neem tree. These trees grow mainly in the Indian subcontinent.

Neem oil is rich in fatty acidsTrusted Source, such as palmitic, linoleic, and oleic acids, which help support healthy skinTrusted Source. The oil is, therefore, a popular ingredient in skin care products.

The leaf of the plant also provides health benefits. The leaves contain plant compounds called flavonoids and polyphenols, which have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties.

Also, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) note that neem oil contains azadirachtin, a natural pesticide.

Benefits for the skin

Researchers have only recently begun to examine how plant compounds influence health and disease. As a result, few scientific studies have investigated the use of neem oil in general skincare or as a treatment for skin conditions.

Authors of a 2013 reviewTrusted Source of the available research into medicinal uses of neem concluded that its extracts can help treat a variety of skin conditions, including:

  • acne
  • psoriasis
  • eczema
  • ringworm
  • warts

The following are some benefits of neem oil and the evidence behind these claims.

First, however, it is important to note that most of the studies involved cell lines or animals. Those that did involve humans only included small numbers of participants. This makes it difficult to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of neem in the general population.

Anti-aging effects

2017 study investigated the anti-aging effects of topical neem leaf extract in hairless mice. The researchers first exposed the mice to skin-damaging ultraviolet B radiation. They then applied neem oil to the skin of some of the rodents.

The team concluded that the oil was effective in treating the following symptoms of skin aging:

  • wrinkles
  • skin thickening
  • skin redness
  • water loss

The researchers also found that the extract boosted levels of a collagen-producing enzyme called procollagen and a protein called elastin.

Collagen gives the skin structure, making it look plump and full, while elastin helps retain the skin’s shape.

Production of these compounds decreases as people age. This eventually leads to dry, deflated-looking, thin skin and the formation of wrinkles.

Promoting wound healing

Research suggests that neem oil may help enhance wound healing.

In one 2010 animal study, researchers discovered that neem oil showed superior wound healing effects, compared with Vaseline. Specifically, the rats that received topical neem oil healed more quickly. They also developed stronger and more resilient tissue at the sites of their wounds.

A similar 2013 study compared the effects of saline and neem oil on wound healing in rats. Those that received neem oil healed faster and did not develop raised scars.

The researchers speculated that compounds in neem oil may promote blood vessel and connective tissue growth, thus enhancing wound healing.

2014 study investigated whether a gel containing neem oil and St. John’s wort could help reduce skin toxicity from radiation therapy. The study involved 28 human participants who were receiving radiation therapy for head and neck cancer.

All participants experienced some reduction in skin toxicity following treatment with the gel. However, it is important to note that this study did not include a placebo control.

Fighting skin infections

2019 studyTrusted Source examined the antibacterial properties of cosmetic products containing neem compounds. The authors found that soaps containing extracts of neem leaf or neem bark prevented the growth of several strains of bacteria.

Risks

Most people can use neem oil safely. However, the EPA consider the oil to be a “low toxicity” substance. It can, for example, cause allergic reactions, such as contact dermatitis.

Also, while ingesting trace amounts of neem oil will likely not cause harm, consuming large quantities can cause adverse effects, especially in children. These may include:

  • vomiting
  • liver damage
  • metabolic acidosis
  • encephalopathy, a term for brain disease, disorder, or damage

How to use it

People should use organic, cold-pressed neem oil. The oil should have a cloudy, yellow-brown color and a strong odor.

Neem oil is generally safe to apply to the skin. However, it is very potent, so it may be a good idea to test it on a small patch of skin before applying it more extensively.

To perform a patch test, mix a couple drops of neem oil with water or liquid soap. Apply the mixture to a small area of skin on the arm or the back of the hand.

If the skin becomes red, inflamed, or itchy, dilute the neem oil further by adding more water or liquid soap. Test this mixture on a different area of skin and watch for any signs of irritation.

People who are allergic to neem oil may develop hives or a rash after a patch test. If this happens, stop using the oil — and any products that contain it — immediately.

Treating skin conditions

Some people use neem oil to treat various skin conditions, including infections and acne.

To use it as a spot treatment, apply a small amount of diluted oil to the affected skin. Let the mixture soak into the skin, then rinse it off with warm water.

Neem oil has a particularly strong odor. To disguise it, try mixing neem oil with a carrier oil, such as jojoba, coconut, or almond oil. Carrier oils also help the skin absorb neem oil.

Summary

Neem oil has a long history of use in traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. Despite this, researchers have only recently begun exploring the potential applications of neem oil in Western medicine.

Neem oil contains fatty acids, antioxidants, and antimicrobial compounds, and these can benefit the skin in a range of ways. Research shows that these compounds may help fight skin infections, promote wound healing, and combat signs of skin aging.

To use neem oil as part of a skincare routine, mix it with water or a carrier oil. It is important to do a patch test when trying neem oil for the first time.

Neem oil is available for purchase online.

Some people experience a reaction to neem oil, such as contact dermatitis. If this occurs, stop using the oil.

butt rash
butt rash
Rashes can appear anywhere on the body, including the butt. Rashes can be painful or itchy and lead to blisters and raw skin, in some cases. Most people associate butt rashes with babies and toddlers, but people of all ages, including adults, can get butt rashes.

Many things from a heat rash to allergies and sexually transmitted infections can cause butt rashes.

Some rashes may respond well to home remedies while others may need medical attention.

Causes of butt rashes in adults

  • Heat rash: This itchy, red rash often appears as blisters or red bumps during hot weather.
  • Ringworm: More commonly known as jock itch, ringworm is a fungal infection that causes a red, ring-shaped rash in the groin and butt area. The rash is often very itchy.
  • Contact dermatitis: This itchy rash is inflammation of the skin caused by direct contact with an irritant.
  • Atopic dermatitis: Also known as eczema, this causes dry skin that tends to be itchier at night.
  • Psoriasis: This is a condition that causes skin cells to build up and form itchy dry patches or scales. Scientists think psoriasis is the result of an immune system problem.
  • Intertrigo: This is an inflammatory condition most commonly found in skin folds. It tends to be accompanied by or worsened by an infection.
  • Acne: Acne that forms on the buttocks is often different from the acne found on the rest of the body. An infection in the hair follicles from shaving or general friction (folliculitis) causes acne on the butt.
  • Shingles: This viral infection is related to chickenpox and causes a severe itchy rash on one side of the body. Shingles normally affects older adults that have had chickenpox.
  • Genital herpes: This common sexually transmitted virus causes rash-like symptoms around the genitals and anus.
  • CandidaCandida is a fungus that lives on skin and causes yeast infections. Yeast infections may cause intense itching and a spreading rash.
  • Incontinence: Rashes thrive and develop in warm moist areas. Often, adults who deal with incontinence wind up with incontinence-related irritation and raw skin.

Symptoms

 General symptoms of a butt rash include the following:
  • red, irritated skin on the butt cheeks or around the anus
  • acne-like lesions on the butt cheeks
  • small, red bumps or dots on the skin
  • itching that is not relieved by scratching
  • sore, painful areas of skin around the buttocks
  • painful or itchy skin around the anus
  • scaly patches of skin on the butt cheeks
  • crusty or leaky blisters, bumps, or pustules

Natural remedies and at-home treatments

Natural rash remedies include the following:

  • Coconut oil: Applying coconut oil to areas of atopic dermatitis reduces symptoms and irritation, studies show.
  • Oatmeal: Applying an oatmeal paste or soaking in an oatmeal bath may help dry up a rash and relieve the itching.
  • Witch hazel: Witch hazel is effective in treating rashes on the buttocks and genital area, according to research published in the Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery.
  • Honey: Rubbing honey on a rash may help clear it up. Honey has antimicrobial properties that may promote skin healing and tissue repair.
  • Chamomile tea compresses: Using compresses soaked in chamomile tea on a rash may help ease the discomfort.
  • Aloe vera: Aloe vera has antiseptic and anti-inflammatory agents that can help soothe damaged skin when rubbed on. It also provides a cooling sensation that may help ease the pain and sting of a painful butt rash.
  • Tea tree oil: Tea tree oil has antiseptic and antimicrobial properties that make it a popular topical treatment for skin ailments.

Over-the-counter (OTC) products that may be helpful for rash treatment include:

  • gentle, fragrance- and oil-free moisturizers
  • oral antihistamines if the rash is caused by an allergic reaction
  • topical hydrocortisone cream to relieve itching
  • anti-inflammatory oral medications, such as ibuprofen, to relieve pain and swelling
  • antifungal creams and sprays

When to see a doctor

Additionally, someone with a butt rash needs to consult a doctor if their butt rash meets any of the following criteria:

  • spreads over a large area of the body
  • it is accompanied by fever
  • the rash starts or spreads suddenly and quickly
  • there are blisters on the genital or anal areas
  • the rash oozes yellow or green fluid
  • there are red streaks coming from the rash
  • pain accompanies the rash

Medical treatments

A doctor may suggest one of the following medical treatments:

  • steroid creams to relieve swelling and itching
  • oral steroids to reduce swelling and inflammation of severe rashes
  • oral antibiotics for rashes caused by bacterial infections
  • prescription-strength antibiotic creams for intertrigo and infections resulting from incontinence
  • prescription-strength antifungal medications for yeast infections, jock itch, and other rashes caused by fungal infections
  • retinoid creams for reducing inflammation and treating rashes from psoriasis
  • antiviral medications to reduce the duration and severity of butt rashes from shingles or herpes
  • drugs, such as immunomodulators and others that alter the immune system, may treat rashes due to allergens or severe psoriasis
  • prescription vitamin D and methotrexate may be used for psoriasis

Prevention

People can prevent the risk of developing a butt rash by following these tips:

  • practice good hygiene, including having regular showers and wiping well after using the bathroom
  • change underwear regularly.
  • use gentle, fragrance-free detergents and body washes
  • avoid rewearing sweaty clothing
  • avoid itchy fabrics, including wool and some synthetics
  • shower and change clothing after exercising or sweating heavily
  • wear loose clothing to prevent rashes from friction
  • consider using antiperspirants to reduce moisture
  • keep the buttocks and genital area clean and dry

Some butt rashes may be preventable; however, others may not.

Overview

A keto diet refers to a ketogenic diet, which is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carb diet. The goal is to get more calories from protein and fat than from carbs. It works by depleting your body of its store of sugar, so it will start to break down protein and fat for energy, causing ketosis (and weight loss).

One extremely popular version of a keto diet is the Atkins diet.

Read on to learn the benefits of the keto diet.

1. Aids in weight loss

It takes more work to turn fat into energy than it takes to turn carbs into energy. Because of this, a ketogenic diet can help speed up weight loss. And since the diet is high in protein, it doesn’t leave you hungry like other diets do. In a meta-analysis of 13 different randomized controlled trials, 5 outcomes revealed significant weight loss from a ketogenic diet.

2. Reduces acne

There are a number of different causes of acne, and one may be related to diet and blood sugar. Eating a diet high in processed and refined carbohydrates can alter gut bacteria and cause more dramatic blood sugar fluctuations, both of which can have an influence on skin health. Therefore, by decreasing carb intake, it’s not a surprise that a ketogenic diet could reduce some cases of acne.

3. May help reduce risk of cancer

The ketogenic diet has recently been investigated a great deal for how it may help prevent or even treat certain cancers. One study found that the ketogenic diet may be a suitable complementary treatment to chemotherapy and radiation in people with cancer. This is due to the fact that it would cause more oxidative stress in cancer cells than in normal cells.

Other theories suggest that because the ketogenic diet reduces high blood sugar, it could reduce insulin complications, which may be associated with some cancers.

4. Improves heart health

When the ketogenic diet is followed in a healthy manner (which considers avocados a healthy fat instead of pork rinds), there is some evidence that the diet can improve heart health by reducing cholesterol. One study found that HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels significantly increased in those following the keto diet. The LDL (“bad”) cholesterol went down significantly.

5. May protect brain functioning

More research is needed into the keto diet and the brain. Some studies suggest that the keto diet offers neuroprotective benefits. These may help treat or prevent conditions like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and even some sleep disorders. One study even found that children following a ketogenic diet had improved alertness and cognitive functioning.

6. Potentially reduces seizures

It’s thought that the combination of fat, protein, and carbs alters the way the body uses energy, resulting in ketosis. Ketosis is an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood.

Ketosis can lead to a reduction in seizures in people with epilepsy. The jury is still out on how effective this actually is, though it seems to be most effective on children who have focal seizures.

7. Improves health in women with PCOS

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder that causes enlarged ovaries with cysts. A high-carbohydrate diet can negatively affect those with PCOS.

There aren’t many clinical studies on the ketogenic diet and PCOS. One pilot study that involved 5 women over a 24-week period found that the ketogenic diet:

  • increased weight loss
  • aided hormone balance
  • improved luteinizing hormone (LH)/follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) ratios
  • improved fasting insulin

More research is needed.

Risks and complications of the keto diet

The ketogenic diet may have health benefits – including quick weight loss. But it’s important to note that staying on the ketogenic diet long-term can have adverse consequences to your health. These include increased risk of:

  • kidney stone formation
  • acidosis (high levels of acid in the blood)
  • severe weight loss or muscle degeneration (for long-term use)
  • In many cases, immediate side effects of the diet may include:
  • constipation
  • sluggishness
  • low blood sugar
  • These symptoms are especially common at the beginning of the diet as your body adjusts.

Your brain and body’s primary and preferred source of energy comes from glucose. Because of this, a drastic elimination of carbohydrates isn’t typically a sustainable method of reaching optimal wellness.

Takeaway

Any drastic change in your diet can have potential consequences to your health. Because of this, you should always talk to your doctor or a nutritionist before starting a new diet.

If you’re interested in starting the keto diet, you should be extra careful to check with your doctor if you have diabetes, hypoglycemia, or heart disease.

Because you don’t want your body to stay in ketosis for too long, you’ll want to discuss other options for dietary changes for an extended period of time.

The ketogenic diet encourages the elimination of refined and processed carbohydrates. However, not all carbohydrates are created equal. Many health benefits come from a diet that includes a variety of nutrient-dense, fibrous carbs, fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, and healthy fats.

Get ready for your prettiest, most confident year yet. Kick your skincare routine into high gear with these blemish-busting and pimple-preventing tips to get flawless skin by the time you head back to school.

1. Always wash your face before bed. Not washing away the day’s grime? You’re asking for a breakout. Stash cleansing wipes on your nightstand for nights when you’re too tired to move.

2. Don’t skimp on sudsing. Wash your face for 30 to 45 seconds with a dime-size amount of cleanser. That’s how long it takes to clear dirt and oil off your face.

3. Use lukewarm water when washing your face. Hot water dries out your skin, and cold water won’t open up your pores.

4. Be gentle. Scrubbing too hard leaves skin rough and red. Skip harsh scrubs and even washcloths, which can be too rough on your face and can cause irritation. Use your hands instead. Be sure they’re clean, or you’ll transfer acne-causing dirt and oil right back!

5. Suds up your cleanser in your hands first. It helps activate the ingredients, so they are more effective when applied to your face!

6. Don’t skip your morning wash. Hairstyling products get absorbed by your pillowcase then transfer to your skin — if it’s not cleared away in the A.M., it’ll clog your pores!

7. Try a cleansing brush. Sometimes even after you wash, there’s makeup left on your skin, and that buildup leads to breakouts. Using an exfoliating brush with your basic cleanser loosens and removes the leftover makeup that has seeped inside your pores! The brush can get deeper into your skin than just your soaped-up fingers.

8. Don’t overwash. If your skin still feels oily, instead of washing again (which can make your skin produce even more oil!), try an astringent after cleansing.

9. Exfoliate. The trick is to remove the layers of dead skin cells and dirt that are blocking your pores — and your skin’s natural glow. Products with alpha hydroxy and lactic acids exfoliate gently to make you look radiant.

11. Turn on the rinse cycle. Leftover cleanser equals leftover dirt and oil. Rinse with tepid water till skin feels clean and smooth and no longer slippery or soapy.

12. Exfoliate in the shower. The steam helps open pores, so the grains can really dig out the grime!

14. Fight acne with a 3-step approach. If you have acne, dermatologists recommend fighting it with a three-step regimen: a salicylic acid cleanser, a benzoyl peroxide spot treatment, and a daily moisturizer.

15. Unclog pores with an all-natural treatment! Whip up a spa-worthy mask right in your own home using strawberries—they’re a great natural exfoliant! This mixture will help smooth bumps and unclog pores. Mix together equal parts mashed strawberries and plain yoghurt. Spread the mixture on clean skin and leave on for 10 to 15 minutes, then rinse with warm water. Follow with alcohol-free toner and moisturizer.

16. Use a clay mask. The ingredients will penetrate deep into your skin and clean out excess oil and bacteria. It’s also an exfoliator to open pores and get rid of the gunk clogged inside!

17. Keep it simple. Too many products can irritate and too many steps may tempt you to skip.

18. Step away from the pimple. Popping can cause infections, making the sitch worse. Instead, dab a sulphur treatment on problem areas morning and night. It brings down swelling until your zit disappears.