Asthma

Everyone, including people in excellent shape, can experience pain in their chest during exercise. The many potential causes range from benign to potentially life-threatening.

Everyone who exercises regularly should recognize the symptoms that can accompany chest pain when the underlying issue is serious.

Read on to learn more about the causes of chest pain during exercise and how to treat and prevent them.

Causes

Serious conditions, such as heart attacks, and less serious issues, such as muscle strains and asthma, can lead to chest pain during exercise.

Heart attack

Myocardial infarction is the medical term for a heart attack. A heart attack occurs when the coronary arteries become blocked. The blockage causes the heart to lose oxygen. If a person does not receive treatment, the heart muscle can die.

A heart attack can cause pain in the jaw, back, chest, and other parts of the upper body. The pain may go away and return, or it may last longer than a few minutes.

Other symptoms of a heart attack include:

  • pressure or pain in the chest
  • sweating
  • nausea
  • dizziness
  • anxiety
  • shortness of breath

Heart attack symptoms can vary. Both men and women are likely to report chest pain, but women are more likely to experience:

  • back pain
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • jaw pain
  • shortness of breath

If a person experiences any symptoms of a heart attack, they should seek immediate medical attention.

According to the American Heart Association, the most common risk factors for a heart attack include:

  • Age. People ages 65 and older are most at risk.
  • Sex. Men have a much higher risk, even when they are younger, than women.
  • Genetics. African-Americans and people with a family history of heart disease are more vulnerable to heart attacks and heart disease.

Angina pectoris

Angina pectoris, or angina, is a pain that stems from the heart. The main cause of angina is a lack of blood flow to the area. When this occurs, a person may feel tightness, pain, or pressure in their chest.

Some additional symptoms of angina include:

  • tightness in the arms or jaw
  • shortness of breath
  • fatigue
  • nausea

Exercise and stress can cause angina, and people often mistake this pain for a heart attack. A person should seek immediate medical attention if they experience any symptoms of a heart attack.

According to the American College of Cardiology, women are three times more likely than men to experience throat discomfort and jaw tightness or pain because of angina.

Women may also experience sharper pain, while men are more likely to experience feelings of pressure associated with angina.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)

According to the American Heart Association, HCM is a common condition that can affect nearly anyone.

HCM occurs when the cells of the heart muscle enlarge, causing the walls of the ventricles to thicken.

HCM can also result if the wall dividing the left and right sides of the heart grows and puts pressure on the ventricles.

In either case, the heart has to work harder to pump blood, and a person may experience:

  • dizziness
  • shortness of breath
  • chest pain
  • fainting

In some people, HCM presents no symptoms. In rare cases, a person may experience sudden cardiac arrest during physical activities.

Asthma

Asthma is a common condition that affects the airways in the lungs.

People with asthma have inflamed airways that tighten in response to triggers, including exercise. The medical term for this is exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

A person with a family history of asthma is more likely to develop it. People with asthma may experience:

  • wheezing
  • coughing
  • chest tightness
  • shortness of breath

Muscle strain and injuries

According to a research paper published in 2013, nearly half of all reported cases of muscle strains in the chest involve the intercostal muscles. These help a person breathe and stabilize the chest.

Common symptoms of muscle strains in the chest include:

  • sharp pain
  • bruising
  • swelling
  • pain while breathing
  • difficulty moving the area

The most common cause of a muscle strain is overuse. As a result, people who regularly exercise the chest muscles are more likely to experience a strain or tear.

The risk of chest muscle strains varies by age group:

  • Older adults are more likely to get this type of strain from a fall.
  • Children are least likely to develop this strain.
  • Adults are most likely to sustain this strain from exercise, sports, or high-impact crashes.

When to see a doctor

Speak to a doctor about any new, unidentified, or worsening chest pain. A doctor can help determine the underlying cause and recommend a treatment plan, which may include lifestyle changes.

Seek emergency medical treatment for any symptoms of a heart attack. Chest pain is the most common symptom, and certain other symptoms, such as nausea, are more common in women than men.

A person with exercise-induced asthma should seek specific treatment. A doctor may be able to prescribe medication and suggest other ways to reduce symptoms. This may enable a person to continue exercising or participating in sports.

Prevention and precautions

Not all chest pain is preventable. However, there are some general tips for preventing some causes of chest pain, such as heart attacks, strains, and asthma.

A person may be able to prevent chest pain by:

  • eating a balanced diet
  • exercising regularly
  • avoiding tobacco smoke and alcohol
  • managing high blood pressure with medications
  • avoiding activities that increase the risk of physical injury
  • controlling asthma with medications

Outlook

A range of conditions, from muscle strains to heart attacks, can cause chest pain during exercise.

Anyone who experiences this pain should consult a healthcare provider about the best course of treatment. Some causes of chest pain can be serious.

Many people can prevent chest pain by making lifestyle changes and following a doctor’s treatment plan.

If any symptoms of a heart attack occur, seek immediate medical attention.

Allergy remedies
Allergy remedies
Allergies are a common cause of illness and can occur at any stage in someone’s life. Numerous different things cause allergies from pollen to food to medication, meaning it is not always easy to know the best treatments or home remedies.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), more than 50 million Americans experience an allergic reaction each year, and the best treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the reaction.

In this article, we take a close look at a range of treatments for allergic reactions, depending on a person’s symptoms and their severity, including anaphylaxis.

Fast facts on treating an allergic reaction:

  • Most minor allergy symptoms can be treated with antihistamines, corticosteroids, or decongestants.
  • Saline nasal rinses can be used for congestion-related allergy symptoms.
  • Corticosteroid creams can treat skin rashes related to allergies.
  • Immunotherapy is a long-term treatment option for chronic allergy symptoms.
  • Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency, and people should call 911 if they suspect someone is having an anaphylactic reaction.

What is an allergic reaction?

The immune system overreacts to these allergens and produces histamine, which is a chemical that causes allergy symptoms, such as inflammation, sneezing, and coughing.

Mild allergic reactions can usually be treated with home remedies and over-the-counter (OTC) medications.

However, chronic allergies need treatment from a medical professional. Severe allergic reactions always require emergency medical care.

Treating allergic reactions

Many mild to moderate allergic reactions can be treated at home or with OTC medications. The following treatments are commonly used to reduce the symptoms of an allergic reaction:

Antihistamines

Antihistamines can help to treat most minor allergic reactions regardless of the cause. These drugs reduce the body’s production of histamine, which reduces all symptoms, including sneezing, watering eyes, and skin reactions.

Second-generation antihistamines, including Claritin (loratadine) and Zyrtec (cetirizine), are less likely to cause drowsiness than first-generation antihistamines, such as Benadryl.

Antihistamines come in several forms, usually to help deliver the medication closer to the source of the reaction or make it easier to consume, such as:

  • oral pills
  • dissolvable tablets
  • nasal sprays
  • liquids
  • eye drops

Antihistamines in these forms are available from pharmacies, to buy online, or on prescription from a doctor.

Antihistamines can also be taken to prevent allergies. Many people with seasonal or pet allergies will begin taking antihistamines when they know they are going to be exposed to an allergen.

A person who is pregnant or has a liver disorder should consult their doctor before taking antihistamines.

Nasal decongestants

Nasal decongestant pills, liquids, and sprays can also help reduce stuffy, swollen sinuses and related symptoms, such as a sore throat or coughing.

However, decongestant medications should not be taken continuously for more than 72 hours.

Nasal decongestants are available over the counter and online.

Anti-inflammatory medication

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) may also be used to help temporarily reduce pain, swelling, and cramping caused by allergies.

Avoid the allergen

The best way to treat and prevent allergic reactions is to know what triggers the reaction and stay away from it, especially food allergens.

When this is not possible or realistic, using antihistamines or decongestants when in contact with allergens can help to treat the symptoms.

Use a saline sinus rinse

The AAAAI recommend the following saline recipe:

  • mix 3 teaspoons of salt (without iodide) with 1 teaspoon of baking soda
  • add 1 teaspoon of this mixture to 8 ounces of boiled water
  • dissolve the mixture in the water then use as a saline rinse

Sinus rinsing devices can be purchased online or from a pharmacy.

Treating environmental allergies

For airborne allergens, such as pollen, dust, and mold spores, additional treatment options include:

  • throat lozenges with soothing ingredients, such as menthol, honey, or ginger
  • shower and wash all clothing after being exposed to an allergen
  • exercise for a few minutes to help reduce nasal congestion

Treating allergies on the skin

For allergic reactions that cause skin symptoms, including those associated with allergens found in animal saliva, poisonous plants, drugs, chemicals and metals, additional treatment options include:

  • Topical corticosteroid creams or tablets. Corticosteroids contain steroids that reduce inflammation and itching. Mild forms of these creams can be found online, and a doctor can prescribe stronger versions.
  • Moisturizing creams. Emollient creams with soothing ingredients, such as calamine can treat skin reactions.
  • Bite or sting medication. Medication targeted to reduce allergic reactions to insect bites or stings have a similar effect to other allergy medications.
  • Ice pack. Applying an ice pack wrapped in cloth to the area for 10- to 15-minute intervals can reduce inflammation.

Treating severe allergies

People should speak to a professional if they have or suspect that they have severe or chronic allergies.

A doctor or allergy specialist can prescribe medications that contain much stronger doses of the compounds found in OTC products.

Treatment options for chronic or severe allergies include:

  • Immunotherapy, or allergy shots. Immunotherapy can be between 90 and 98 percent effective at reducing allergic reactions to insect stings, for instance.
  • Prescription asthma medications, such as bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroids.
  • Oral cromolyn can be taken for food allergies.
  • Drug desensitization therapy is used for specific allergens.

Natural remedies for allergic reactions

Many traditional medicine systems use herbal supplements and extracts to both treat and prevent allergic reactions, especially seasonal allergies.

Though there is little scientific evidence to support the use of most alternative or natural remedies, some people may find that some can provide relief from their symptoms.

The American Association of Naturopathic Physicians recommend the following natural treatments for allergies:

  • Dietary changes. A low-fat diet high in complex carbohydrates, such as beans, whole grains, and vegetables may reduce allergy reactions.
  • Bioflavonoids. These plant-based chemicals found in citrus fruits and blackcurrants may act as natural antihistamines. These can also be taken as supplements.
  • Supplements. Flaxseed oil, zinc, and vitamins A, C, and E are suggested to improve allergy symptoms.
  • Acupuncture. Acupuncture treatments may help some people to find relief from their symptoms.

Identifying and treating anaphylaxis

A very severe allergic reaction can lead to a condition called anaphylaxis, or anaphylactic shock.

Anaphylaxis occurs when the body’s immune response to an allergen is so severe and sudden that the body goes into a state of shock.

Anaphylaxis can impact multiple organs and if left untreated lead to coma, organ failure, and death.

The early symptoms of anaphylaxis can be fairly mild and similar to those of minor to moderate allergic reactions, but they often rapidly worsen.

Symptoms unique to anaphylaxis include:

  • unexplained anxiety
  • tingling in the palms of the hand, soles of the feet, and lips
  • swollen tongue, throat, mouth, and face
  • difficulty breathing
  • rapid but weak pulse
  • low blood pressure
  • sense of dread or doom
  • vomiting or diarrhea
  • confusion or disorientation
  • loss of consciousness
  • very pale or blue skin
  • a heart attack

Anyone who suspects anaphylaxis should call 911 and seek emergency medical care.

If the person carries an EpiPen, which is a self-injectable dose of epinephrine that is designed to treat anaphylaxis, inject this into their thigh, as soon as possible.

First aid for anaphylaxis includes:

  • try to keep the person calm
  • the person may vomit, so turn them on their side and keep their mouth clear
  • try to get the person to lay flat on their back with their feet raised about a foot above the ground
  • make sure the person’s clothing is loose or remove constricting clothing
  • do not give them anything to drink or eat, even if they ask for it
  • if they are not breathing, practice CPR with around 100 firm chest compressions every minute until emergency services arrive

If a person does not have an EpiPen, a doctor or paramedic will give an injection of the hormone epinephrine, or adrenaline. This will immediately increase the output of the heart and blood flow throughout the body.

A person should seek medical care each time anaphylaxis occurs. Even if they start to feel better or their symptoms go away, a second severe allergic reaction can occur up to 12 hours after the initial response.

Allergy symptoms

The symptoms associated with an allergic response depend on the specific allergen, how severe the allergy is, and whether a person has touched, swallowed, or inhaled the allergen.

Not everyone responds the same way to each allergen. But there are similar sets of symptoms most people experience when exposed to specific allergens.

Common symptoms associated with different type of allergens include:

Airborne allergens Animal saliva Insect stings/bites Food allergens Drug allergens Metal/ chemical allergens
Sneezing/ itchy nose Y Y
Runny/stuffy nose Y Y
Coughing Y Y
Skin rash/itchy skin Y Y Y Y Y
Wheezing/ shortness of breath Y Y
Hives/welts Y Y Y Y
Pain, redness and swelling at the exposure point Y Y Y Y
Peeling /blistering skin Y Y
Watery, itchy, red eyes Y Y
Sore throat
Vomiting, nausea, or diarrhea Y
Swelling of the throat, tongue, and mouth Y Y Y
Dizziness Y Y Y
Sun sensitivity Y
Itchy mouth/odd taste in the mouth Y Y
Pale skin Y Y
Swelling of the eyes, face, and genitals Y
Chronic joint or muscle pain Y Y

Outlook

Many people experience allergic reactions when they are exposed to specific allergens, ranging from pet dander and pollen to compounds in foods, drinks, and personal hygiene products.

The best way to treat an allergic reaction depends on the cause, though most minor cases can be treated with OTC antihistamine and anti-itch products.

A person should seek immediate medical attention for chronic or severe allergic reactions, especially those that involve swelling of the throat or changes in heart rate. Anaphylaxis should always be treated as a medical emergency.

Chocolate lovers, rejoice; the sweet treat is not only delicious, but studies show that it can also promote friendly bacteria and reduce inflammation in our guts.

First, some background: trillions of bacteria live in our guts. They contribute to our immune system, metabolism, and many other processes essential to human health.

When the delicate balance of microbes in our intestines is disturbed, it can have serious consequences.

Irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, autism spectrum disorders, allergies, asthma, and cancer have all been linked to abnormal gut microbiomes.

A healthful diet supports bacterial diversity and health, but could chocolate be an integral part of this?

Benefits of cocoa

Cocoa is the dry, non-fatty component prepared from the seeds of the Theobroma cacao tree and the ingredient that gives chocolate its characteristic taste.

Many health benefits have been attributed to cocoa and its potent antioxidant functions. These include lowering cholesterol, slowing down cognitive decline, and keeping the heart healthy.

Cocoa metabolism is partly dependent on the bacteria that live in our intestines.

Our bodies are only able to absorb some of the nutrients in chocolate. As such, we need our tiny microbial passengers to break complex molecules into smaller components, which we would not be able to take into our bodies otherwise.

This allows us to make full use of the many health-promoting molecules in cocoa. It doesn’t stop there, however. The gut microbes also benefit from this relationship, which, in turn, has an even greater effect on our health.

Gut health and inflammation

Several studies show that the consumption of cocoa increases the levels of so-called friendly bacteria in the gut.

Researchers from the Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Reading in the United Kingdom measured higher levels of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species in the intestines of human volunteers who drank high-cocoa chocolate milk for 4 weeks.

The same team previously showed that components in cocoa can reduce the growth of Clostridium histolyticum bacteria, which are present in the guts of individuals with inflammatory bowel disease.

In pigs, higher levels of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species were also found in the colon in response to a high-cocoa diet. Interestingly, the expression of known inflammatory markers was reduced.

Friendly bacteria including Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium have, in fact, been implicated in actively promoting anti-inflammatory processes in our intestines, keeping our gut healthy.

Chocolate as part of a healthful diet

Despite the fact that these scientific studies support the claim that cocoa can be beneficial for our gut microbiomes, cocoa does not equal chocolate.

The cocoa extracts used in research do not contain the high levels of sugar and fat found in our everyday chocolate bars.

Unsweetened cocoa powder or high-cocoa content dark chocolate are the closest alternatives to the cocoa used in these studies. Consumed in moderation, chocolate may therefore promote friendly bacteria, and, by extension, a healthy gut, keeping inflammation at bay.

Everyone has experienced a nagging cough after a cold or needed to cough while in a quiet room.

Despite these problems, coughing actually serves a very valuable and useful purpose. Coughing is a protective action, helping the lungs clear out potential germs or harmful objects.

Sometimes, however, that cough is not linked to a cold or infection and can linger for weeks to months at a time. This may lead people to wonder or worry that their cough is a sign of something more serious, such as lung cancer.

This article takes a look at the connection between coughing and lung cancer, including when someone should see a doctor.

Coughing and lung cancer

A cough associated with lung cancer may be either dry or wet.
A cough associated with lung cancer may be either dry or wet.

Not every cough signifies the presence of lung cancer. However, many people do complain of a chronic cough or a “cough that just won’t go away” at the time of their diagnosis.

If a cough is associated with other symptoms, such as those in the list below, it warrants a trip to the doctor to get checked out:

  • coughing up blood or rust-coloured phlegm
  • shortness of breath
  • chest pain

A cough that is associated with lung cancer can be either dry or wet. It can occur at any time, and even be so severe that it interferes with sleep at night.

Lung cancer symptoms

There are many symptoms other than persistent or worsening coughing that is associated with lung cancer. Some of these symptoms include:

  • ongoing chest pain
  • coughing up blood
  • shortness of breath
  • wheezing or hoarseness of the voice
  • problems swallowing
  • loss of appetite
  • losing weight
  • Fatigue and tiredness
  • frequent lung infections, such as pneumonia or bronchitis

Causes of coughing

Man in field of yellow flowers coughing and blowing his nose.
Allergies such as hay fever may cause short-term coughing. A long-term cough that does not clear up a few weeks, or that gets worse, may have a more serious cause.

There are many reasons why someone might be coughing. A short-term cough can be caused by:

  • an infection, such as a cold, pneumonia, or bronchitis
  • an allergy, such as hay fever
  • inhaled dust, smoke, or debris
  • a long-term respiratory condition, such as asthma or COPD

Sometimes, a short-term cough can develop into a chronic or a persistent cough. When this happens, it may be caused by one of the following factors:

  • Long-term respiratory infection, such as chronic bronchitis or pneumonia.
  • Asthma, which causes shortness of breath, tightening of the chest, and wheezing.
  • Allergies, such as hay fever.
  • Smoking. Chronic coughing in a smoker is also known as a “smoker’s cough” and is the result of smoke and other debris irritating the airways.
  • Bronchiectasis, which is a widening of the airways in the lungs.
  • Postnasal drip, which is mucus dripping down the throat and triggering a cough. This is usually associated with a cold or allergy.
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), where stomach acid flows back into the food pipe. The throat gets irritated by the acid and triggers a cough.
  • Medications, such as ACE inhibitors, which are used to treat high blood pressure and heart disease.

When to see a doctor

Most coughs clear up within a few days to a few weeks.

It is important to see the doctor if the cough is persistent or occurs along with other symptoms, such as coughing up blood or chest pain.

Seeing a doctor promptly can help to determine the cause of a cough and ensure that nothing more serious is going on.

Diagnosis

Firstly, the doctor will take a thorough medical history and perform a physical exam. In addition to asking about family and personal medical history, the doctor will ask about the history of coughing, shortness of breath, and other symptoms.

During the physical exam, the doctor will listen to the heart and lungs, and look for other potential causes of the coughing, such as signs of an infection or postnasal drip.

Depending on the findings from the history and physical, the doctor may order additional testing. This may include imaging tests, such as:

  • a chest X-ray
  • CAT scan
  • PET scan
  • MRI

If lung cancer is suspected based on these results, the doctor will likely want to take a biopsy of the suspicious cells. A doctor can do this by passing a needle into the lung tissue through the skin.

Another way is by bronchoscopy, where a small tube is inserted down the nose and into the lungs. A small sample is removed through the tube and analyzed.

A specialist called a pathologist will look at the cell samples under the microscope to determine if there is cancer. If cancer is present, they will also work out the type, and how far it has advanced.

If lung cancer is diagnosed, the doctor may want to order additional testing to see if it has spread beyond the lungs.

Researchers have also found some genetic markers that can impact how a cancer behaves. This includes whether it is aggressive or spreads quickly, or is responsive to certain hormones.

Some doctors will order genetic testing to look for these genetic markers. Positive results can sometimes help with making treatment decisions, as there are new medications that can be more effective than traditional therapies.

Treatment options

Senior mans hand in chair as he receives chemotherapy.
Chemotherapy is a common treatment option for lung cancer, although complete removal of the tumor is usually preferable.

The best treatment for lung cancer is complete removal of the tumor and unhealthy cells surrounding it.

Removal is usually only an option when the growth is small and contained, or has only spread to the nearby tissues.

Radiation or chemotherapy is sometimes also given to ensure that all of the cancerous cells have been removed or destroyed.

Once a tumour has spread significantly, it may no longer be removable or curable. The doctor may recommend radiation or palliative care to prevent further complications and treat symptoms.

New targeted therapies may be more successful in certain groups of people or with particular types of cancers. These include female non-smokers or carriers of certain genetic markers.

The doctor can help work out whether someone may benefit from these types of treatments.

Outlook

The outlook for someone diagnosed with lung cancer depends on the stage of cancer when it is diagnosed.

In general, someone with small cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body has a much better outlook than someone who has an aggressive form of cancer that has spread.

Early diagnosis and treatment are very important in increasing the odds of surviving lung cancer. There is no screening test, which can make early detection more difficult.

The best way to prevent lung cancer is to live a healthful lifestyle and avoid cigarette smoke whenever possible. In addition to not smoking, or quitting smoking, avoiding secondhand smoke is essential.

Someone with a high risk of developing lung cancer, based on either family history or history of smoking, should discuss any unusual symptoms with their doctor as soon as possible. These symptoms include a persistent cough that occurs with chest pain, shortness of breath, or blood.